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Author Zalamea, P.C.; Munoz, F.; Stevenson, P.R.; Paine, C.E.T.; Sarmiento, C.; Sabatier, D.; Heuret, P.
Title Continental-scale patterns of Cecropia reproductive phenology: evidence from herbarium specimens Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Proceedings Of The Royal Society B-Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume (down) 278 Issue 1717 Pages 2437-2445
Keywords climate seasonality; reproductive patterns; Fourier spectral and cospectral analyses; herbarium collections; Neotropics; pioneer plants
Abstract Plant phenology is concerned with the timing of recurring biological events. Though phenology has traditionally been studied using intensive surveys of a local flora, results from such surveys are difficult to generalize to broader spatial scales. In this study, contrastingly, we assembled a continental-scale dataset of herbarium specimens for the emblematic genus of Neotropical pioneer trees, Cecropia, and applied Fourier spectral and cospectral analyses to investigate the reproductive phenology of 35 species. We detected significant annual, sub-annual and continuous patterns, and discuss the variation in patterns within and among climatic regions. Although previous studies have suggested that pioneer species generally produce flowers continually throughout the year, we found that at least one third of Cecropia species are characterized by clear annual flowering behaviour. We further investigated the relationships between phenology and climate seasonality, showing strong associations between phenology and seasonal variations in precipitation and temperature. We also verified our results against field survey data gathered from the literature. Our findings indicate that herbarium material is a reliable resource for use in the investigation of large-scale patterns in plant phenology, offering a promising complement to local intensive field studies.
Address [Zalamea, PC; Sabatier, D] IRD, UMR AMAP, F-34000 Montpellier, France, Email: camilozalamea@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Soc Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000292592000005 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 328
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Author Fu, Z.; Gerken, T.; Bromley, G.; Araújo, A.; Bonal, D.; Burban, B.; Ficklin, D.; Fuentes, J.D.; Goulden, M.; Hirano, T.; Kosugi, Y.; Liddell, M.; Nicolini, G.; Niu, S.; Roupsard, O.; Stefani, P.; Mi, C.; Tofte, Z.; Xiao, J.; Valentini, R.; Wolf, S.; Stoy, P.C.
Title The surface-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide in tropical rainforests: Sensitivity to environmental drivers and flux measurement methodology Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Abbreviated Journal Agric. For. Meterol.
Volume (down) 263 Issue Pages 292-307
Keywords Climate variability; Ecosystem respiration; Eddy covariance; Gross primary productivity; Net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange; Tropical rainforest; acclimation; air temperature; anthropogenic effect; atmosphere-biosphere interaction; biodiversity; carbon flux; climate change; Cmip; eddy covariance; environmental change; flux measurement; methodology; net ecosystem exchange; net ecosystem production; radiative forcing; rainforest; sensitivity analysis; tropical environment
Abstract Tropical rainforests play a central role in the Earth system by regulating climate, maintaining biodiversity, and sequestering carbon. They are under threat by direct anthropogenic impacts like deforestation and the indirect anthropogenic impacts of climate change. A synthesis of the factors that determine the net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) at the site scale across different forests in the tropical rainforest biome has not been undertaken to date. Here, we study NEE and its components, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (RE), across thirteen natural and managed forests within the tropical rainforest biome with 63 total site-years of eddy covariance data. Our results reveal that the five ecosystems with the largest annual gross carbon uptake by photosynthesis (i.e. GEP > 3000 g C m−2 y-1) have the lowest net carbon uptake – or even carbon losses – versus other study ecosystems because RE is of a similar magnitude. Sites that provided subcanopy CO2 storage observations had higher average magnitudes of GEP and RE and lower average magnitudes of NEE, highlighting the importance of measurement methodology for understanding carbon dynamics in ecosystems with characteristically tall and dense vegetation. A path analysis revealed that vapor pressure deficit (VPD) played a greater role than soil moisture or air temperature in constraining GEP under light saturated conditions across most study sites, but to differing degrees from -0.31 to -0.87 μmol CO2 m−2 s-1 hPa-1. Climate projections from 13 general circulation models (CMIP5) under the representative concentration pathway that generates 8.5 W m−2 of radiative forcing suggest that many current tropical rainforest sites on the lower end of the current temperature range are likely to reach a climate space similar to present-day warmer sites by the year 2050, warmer sites will reach a climate not currently experienced, and all forests are likely to experience higher VPD. Results demonstrate the need to quantify if and how mature tropical trees acclimate to heat and water stress, and to further develop flux-partitioning and gap-filling algorithms for defensible estimates of carbon exchange in tropical rainforests. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
Address Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, 8092, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier B.V. Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 01681923 (Issn) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Export Date: 12 November 2018; Coden: Afmee; Correspondence Address: Stoy, P.C.; Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State UniversityUnited States; email: paul.stoy@montana.edu; Funding details: ANR-10-LABX-25-01; Funding details: U.S. Department of Energy, DOE, SC0011097; Funding details: Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR; Funding details: 1702029; Funding details: 1552976; Funding details: Graduate School, Ohio State University; Funding details: National Natural Science Foundation of China, NSFC, 31625006; Funding text 1: PCS and JDF acknowledges funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the GoAmazon project (Grant SC0011097 ). PCS additionally acknowledges the U.S. National Science Foundation grants 1552976 and 1702029 , and The Graduate School at Montana State University . ZF is supported by the China Scholarship Council and National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 31625006 ). This work used eddy covariance data acquired and shared by the FLUXNET community, including the AmeriFlux, AfriFlux, AsiaFlux, CarboAfrica, LBA, and TERN- OzFlux networks. The FLUXNET eddy covariance data processing and harmonization was carried out by the ICOS Ecosystem Thematic Center, AmeriFlux Management Project and Fluxdata project of FLUXNET, with the support of CDIAC, and the OzFlux, ChinaFlux and AsiaFlux offices. The Guyaflux program belongs to the SOERE F-ORE-T which is supported annually by Ecofor, Allenvi and the French national research infrastructure ANAEE-F. The Guyaflux program also received support from the “Observatoire du Carbone en Guyane” and an “investissement d'avenir” grant from the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (CEBA, ref ANR-10-LABX-25-01). Funding for the site PA-SPn was provided by the North-South Centre of ETH Zurich. 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Change, 6, pp. 1023-1027; Oberbauer, S.F., Loescher, H.W., Clark, D.B., Effects of climate factors on daytime carbon exchange from an old growth forest in Costa rica (2000) Selbyana, pp. 66-73; Oren, R., Sperry, J.S., Katul, G.G., Pataki, D.E., Ewers, B.E., Phillips, N., Schäfer, K.V.R., Survey and synthesis of intra- and interspecific variation in stomatal sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit (1999) Plant Cell Environ., 22, pp. 1515-1526; Pan, Y., Birdsey, R.A., Fang, J., Houghton, R., Kauppi, P.E., Kurz, W.A., Phillips, O.L., Hayes, D., A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests (2011) Science, 333 (80). , 988 LP-993; Paoli, G.D., Curran, L.M., Slik, J.W.F., Soil nutrients affect spatial patterns of aboveground biomass and emergent tree density in southwestern Borneo (2008) Oecologia, 155, pp. 287-299; Papale, D., Reichstein, M., Aubinet, M., Canfora, E., Bernhofer, C., Kutsch, W., Longdoz, B., Yakir, D., Towards a standardized processing of Net Ecosystem Exchange measured with eddy covariance technique: algorithms and uncertainty estimation (2006) Biogeosciences, 3, pp. 571-583; Pau, S., Detto, M., Kim, Y., Still, C.J., Tropical forest temperature thresholds for gross primary productivity (2018) Ecosphere, 9; Pavlick, R., Drewry, D.T., Bohn, K., Reu, B., Kleidon, A., The Jena Diversity-Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (JeDi-DGVM): a diverse approach to representing terrestrial biogeography and biogeochemistry based on plant functional trade-offs (2013) Biogeosciences, 10, pp. 4137-4177; Phillips, O.L., Malhi, Y., Higuchi, N., Laurance, W.F., Núñez, P.V., Vásquez, R.M., Laurance, S.G., Grace, J., Changes in the carbon balance of tropical forests: Evidence from long-term plots (1998) Science, 282 (80). , 439 LP-442; Phillips, O.L., Aragão, L.E.O.C., Lewis, S.L., Fisher, J.B., Lloyd, J., López-González, G., Malhi, Y., Torres-Lezama, A., Drought sensitivity of the Amazon Rainforest (2009) Science, 323 (80), pp. 1344-1347; Powell, T.L., Wheeler, J.K., de Oliveira, A.A.R., da Costa, A.C.L., Saleska, S.R., Meir, P., Moorcroft, P.R., Differences in xylem and leaf hydraulic traits explain differences in drought tolerance among mature Amazon rainforest trees (2017) Glob. Change Biol.; Raich, J.W., Russell, A.E., Vitousek, P.M., Primary productivity and ecosystem development along an elevational gradient on Mauna Loa, Hawai'i (1997) Ecology, 78, pp. 707-721; Reichstein, M., Falge, E., Baldocchi, D., Papale, D., Aubinet, M., Berbigier, P., Bernhofer, C., Valentini, R., On the separation of net ecosystem exchange into assimilation and ecosystem respiration: review and improved algorithm (2005) Glob. Change Biol., 11, pp. 1424-1439; Restrepo-Coupe, N., da Rocha, H.R., Hutyra, L.R., da Araujo, A.C., Borma, L.S., Christoffersen, B., Cabral, O.M.R., Saleska, S.R., What drives the seasonality of photosynthesis across the Amazon basin? A cross-site analysis of eddy flux tower measurements from the Brasil flux network (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol.; Rice, W.R., Analyzing tables of statistical tests (1989) Evolution (N. Y.), 43, pp. 223-225; Richardson, A.D., Braswell, B.H., Hollinger, D.Y., Jenkins, J.P., Ollinger, S.V., Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology (2009) Ecol. Appl., 19, pp. 1417-1428; Roderick, M.L., Farquhar, G.D., The cause of decreased Pan evaporation over the past 50 years (2002) Science, 298 (80), pp. 1410-1411; Roupsard, O., Bonnefond, J.-M., Irvine, M., Berbigier, P., Nouvellon, Y., Dauzat, J., Taga, S., Bouillet, J.-P., Partitioning energy and evapo-transpiration above and below a tropical palm canopy (2006) Agric. For. Meteorol., 139, pp. 252-268; Saleska, S.R., Miller, S.D., Matross, D.M., Goulden, M., Wofsy, S., da Rocha, H.R., de Camargo, P.B., Silva, H., Carbon in Amazon forests: unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-induced losses (2003) Science, 302 (80), pp. 1554-1557; Saleska, S.R., Didan, K., Huete, A.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Amazon forests green-up during 2005 drought (2007) Science, 318 (80), p. 612; Saleska, S., Da Rocha, H., Kruijt, B., Nobre, A., Ecosystem carbon fluxes and Amazonian forest metabolism (2009) Amazonia Glob. Change, pp. 389-407; Saleska, S.R., Wu, J., Guan, K., Araujo, A.C., Huete, A., Nobre, A.D., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Dry-season greening of Amazon forests (2016) Nature, 531, pp. E4-E5; Salinas, N., Malhi, Y., Meir, P., Silman, M., Roman Cuesta, R., Huaman, J., Salinas, D., Farfan, F., The sensitivity of tropical leaf litter decomposition to temperature: results from a large-scale leaf translocation experiment along an elevation gradient in Peruvian forests (2011) New Phytol., 189, pp. 967-977; Santana, R.A., Dias-Júnior, C.Q., da Silva, J.T., Fuentes, J.D., do Vale, R.S., Alves, E.G., dos Santos, R.M.N., Manzi, A.O., Air turbulence characteristics at multiple sites in and above the Amazon rainforest canopy (2018) Agric. For. Meteorol., 260-261, pp. 41-54; Santos, D.M., Acevedo, O.C., Chamecki, M., Fuentes, J.D., Gerken, T., Stoy, P.C., Temporal scales of the nocturnal flow within and above a forest canopy in Amazonia (2016) Boundary-Layer Meteorol., pp. 1-26; Siddiq, Z., Chen, Y.-J., Zhang, Y.-J., Zhang, J.-L., Cao, K.-F., More sensitive response of crown conductance to VPD and larger water consumption in tropical evergreen than in deciduous broadleaf timber trees (2017) Agric. For. Meteorol., 247, pp. 399-407; Sulman, B.N., Roman, D.T., Yi, K., Wang, L., Phillips, R.P., Novick, K.A., High atmospheric demand for water can limit forest carbon uptake and transpiration as severely as dry soil (2016) Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, pp. 9686-9695; Swann, A.L.S., Hoffman, F.M., Koven, C.D., Randerson, J.T., Plant responses to increasing CO2 reduce estimates of climate impacts on drought severity (2016) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 113, pp. 10019-10024; Taylor, K.E., Stouffer, R.J., Meehl, G.A., An overview of CMIP5 and the experiment design (2012) Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc.; Taylor, P.G., Cleveland, C.C., Wieder, W.R., Sullivan, B.W., Doughty, C.E., Dobrowski, S.Z., Townsend, A.R., Temperature and rainfall interact to control carbon cycling in tropical forests (2017) Ecol. Lett., 20, pp. 779-788; Thomas, C.K., Martin, J.G., Law, B.E., Davis, K., Toward biologically meaningful net carbon exchange estimates for tall, dense canopies: multi-level eddy covariance observations and canopy coupling regimes in a mature Douglas-fir forest in Oregon (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol., 173, pp. 14-27; Tóta, J., Fitzjarrald, D.R., da Silva Dias, M.A.F., Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: manaus LBA Site—a complex terrain condition (2012) Transfus. Apher. Sci., , 165067; Tyukavina, A., Baccini, A., Hansen, M.C., Potapov, P.V., Stehman, S.V., Houghton, R.A., Krylov, A.M., Goetz, S.J., Aboveground carbon loss in natural and managed tropical forests from 2000 to 2012 (2015) Environ. Res. Lett., 10, p. 74002; van Marle, M.J.E., Field, R.D., van der Werf, G.R., Estrada de Wagt, I.A., Houghton, R.A., Rizzo, L.V., Artaxo, P., Tsigaridis, K., Fire and deforestation dynamics in Amazonia (1973-2014) (2017) Glob. Biogeochem. Cycles, 31, pp. 24-38; Wieder, W.R., Cleveland, C.C., Townsend, A.R., Controls over leaf litter decomposition in wet tropical forests (2009) Ecology, 90, pp. 3333-3341; Wolf, S., Eugster, W., Majorek, S., Buchmann, N., Afforestation of tropical pasture only marginally affects ecosystem-scale evapotranspiration (2011) Ecosystems, 14, pp. 1264-1275; Wolf, S., Eugster, W., Potvin, C., Buchmann, N., Strong seasonal variations in net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a tropical pasture and afforestation in Panama (2011) Agric. For. Meteorol., 151, pp. 1139-1151; Wolf, S., Eugster, W., Potvin, C., Turner, B.L., Buchmann, N., Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama (2011) Glob. Change Biol., 17, pp. 2763-2780; Wood, A.W., Leung, L.R., Sridhar, V., Lettenmaier, D.P., Hydrologic implications of dynamical and statistical approaches to downscaling climate model outputs (2004) Clim. Change, 62, pp. 189-216; Wu, J., Guan, K., Hayek, M., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Wiedemann, K.T., Xu, X., Wehr, R., Saleska, S.R., Partitioning controls on Amazon forest photosynthesis between environmental and biotic factors at hourly to interannual timescales (2017) Glob. Change Biol., 23, pp. 1240-1257; Xiao, J., Liu, S., Stoy, P.C., Preface: impacts of extreme climate events and disturbances on carbon dynamics (2016) Biogeosciences, 13, pp. 3665-3675 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 831
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Author Rutishauser, E.; Barthelemy, D.; Blanc, L.; Nicolini, E.A.
Title Crown fragmentation assessment in tropical trees: Method, insights and perspectives Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Forest Ecology and Management Abbreviated Journal For. Ecol. Manage.
Volume (down) 261 Issue 3 Pages 400-407
Keywords Crown assessment; Crown fragmentation; Tree mortality; Forest dynamics
Abstract Decreasing growth rate (Feeley et al., 2007) and large die-back due to drought (Phillips et al., 2009) suggest that tropical forests are suffering recent climate changes. Forest vulnerability to external factors (e.g. air pollution, acid rain) is widely studied in northern countries, while only a few attempts have investigated crown integrity in the Tropics. The method needs to be generic enough to account for the large number of species and crown shapes encountered in tropical forests. In the present study, we developed and tested a novel field method that estimates crown fragmentation (main branch mortality (MB) and secondary branch mortality (SB)), liana infestation (LI) and crown position (CP) in the canopy. The relationship between crown fragmentation and annual growth rate (agr) was investigated through multiple regression. Six out of eight canopy tree species showed significant growth decline with increasing crown fragmentation. Higher probability of death was also found in trees with severe crown fragmentation. The capacity of such crown assessment to depict tree vitality in a forest stand is discussed along with potential applications in both forest science and management. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Address [Rutishauser, Ervan; Eric-Andre, Nicolini] Cirad UMR AMAP, F-34398 Montpellier 5, France, Email: er.rutishauser@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1127 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes ISI:000287333000009 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 293
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Author Cecilia Blundo ; Julieta Carilla ; Ricardo Grau ; Agustina Malizia ; Lucio Malizia ; Oriana Osinaga-Acosta ; Michael Bird ; Bradford, Matt ; Damien Catchpole ; Andrew Ford ; Andrew Graham ; David Hilbert ; Jeanette Kemp ; Susan Laurance ; William Laurance ; Francoise Yoko Ishida ; Andrew Marshall ; Catherine Waite ; Hannsjoerg Woell ; Jean-Francois Bastin ; Marijn Bauters ; Hans Beeckman ; Pfascal Boeckx ; Jan Bogaert ; Charles De Canniere ; Thales de Haulleville ; Jean-Louis Doucet ; Olivier Hardy ; Wannes Hubau ; Elizabeth Kearsley ; Hans Verbeeck ; Jason Vleminckx ; Steven W. Brewer ; Alfredo Alarc´on ; Alejandro Araujo-Murakami ; Eric Arets ; Luzmila Arroyo ; Ezequiel Chavez ; Todd Fredericksen ; Ren´e Guill´en Villaroel ; Gloria Gutierrez Sibauty ; Timothy Killeen ; Juan Carlos Licona ; John Lleigue ; Casimiro Mendoza ; Samaria Murakami ; Alexander Parada Gutierrez ; Guido Pardo ; Marielos Pena-Claros ; Lourens Poorter ; Marisol Toledo ; Jeanneth Villalobos Cayo ; Laura Jessica Viscarra ; Vincent Vos ; Jorge Ahumada ; Everton Almeida ; Jarcilene Almeida aq, Edmar Almeida de Oliveira ; Wesley Alves da Cruz ; Atila Alves de Oliveira ; Fabrício Alvim Carvalho ; Flavio Amorim Obermuller ; Ana Andrade ; Fernanda Antunes Carvalho ; Simone Aparecida Vieira ; Ana Carla Aquino ; Luiz Aragao ; Ana Claudia Araújo ; Marco Antonio Assis ; Jose Ataliba Mantelli Aboin Gomes ; Fabrício Baccaro ; Plínio Barbosa de Camargo ; Paulo Barni ; Jorcely Barroso ; Luis Carlos Bernacci ; Kauane Bordin ; Marcelo Brilhante de Medeiros ; Igor Broggio ; Jose Luís Camargo ; Domingos Cardoso ; Maria Antonia Carniello ; Andre Luis Casarin Rochelle ; Carolina Castilho ; Antonio Alberto Jorge Farias Castro ; Wendeson Castro ; Sabina Cerruto Ribeiro ; Flavia Costa ; Rodrigo Costa de Oliveira ; Italo Coutinho ; John Cunha ; Lola da Costa ; Lucia da Costa Ferreira ; Richarlly da Costa Silva ; Marta da Graça Zacarias Simbine ; Vitor de Andrade Kamimura ; Haroldo Cavalcante de Lima ; Lia de Oliveira Melo ; Luciano de Queiroz ; Jose Romualdo de Sousa Lima ; Mario do Espírito Santo ; Tomas Domingues ; Nayane Cristina dos Santos Prestes ; Steffan Eduardo Silva Carneiro ; Fernando Elias ; Gabriel Eliseu ; Thaise Emilio ; Camila Laís Farrapo ; Letícia Fernandes ; Gustavo Ferreira ; Joice Ferreira ; Leandro Ferreira ; Socorro Ferreira ; Marcelo Fragomeni Simon ; Maria Aparecida Freitas ; Queila S. García ; Angelo Gilberto Manzatto ; Paulo Graça ; Frederico Guilherme ; Eduardo Hase ; Niro Higuchi ; Mariana Iguatemy ; Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa ; Margarita Jaramillo
Title Taking the pulse of Earth’s tropical forests using networks of highly distributed plots Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 260 Issue Pages
Keywords parcelle, forêt tropicale, biodiversité forestière, Écosystème forestier, Écologie forestière, Changement de couvert végétal, Couvert forestier
Abstract Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of funding agencies. Here we show how a global community is responding to the challenges of tropical ecosystem research with diverse teams measuring forests tree-by-tree in thousands of long-term plots. We review the major scientific discoveries of this work and show how this process is changing tropical forest science. Our core approach involves linking long-term grassroots initiatives with standardized protocols and data management to generate robust scaled-up results. By connecting tropical researchers and elevating their status, our Social Research Network model recognises the key role of the data originator in scientific discovery. Conceived in 1999 with RAINFOR (South America), our permanent plot networks have been adapted to Africa (AfriTRON) and Southeast Asia (T-FORCES) and widely emulated worldwide. Now these multiple initiatives are integrated via ForestPlots.net cyber-infrastructure, linking colleagues from 54 countries across 24 plot networks. Collectively these are transforming understanding of tropical forests and their biospheric role. Together we have discovered how, where and why forest carbon and biodiversity are responding to climate change, and how they feedback on it. This long-term pan-tropical collaboration has revealed a large long-term carbon sink and its trends, as well as making clear which drivers are most important, which forest processes are affected, where they are changing, what the lags are, and the likely future responses of tropical forests as the climate continues to change. By leveraging a remarkably old technology, plot networks are sparking a very modern revolution in tropical forest science. In the future, humanity can benefit greatly by nurturing the grassroots communities now collectively capable of generating unique, long-term understanding of Earth's most precious forests.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 1021
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Author Amani, Bienvenu H.K. ; N'Guessan, Anny E. ; Derroire, Géraldine ; N'dja, Justin K. ; Elogne, Aka G. M. ; Traoré, Karidia ; Zo-Bi, Irie C. ; Hérault, Bruno
Title The potential of secondary forests to restore biodiversity of the lost forests in semi-deciduous West Africa Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 259 Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract In West Africa, more than 80% of the original forest cover has disappeared due to the exponential growth of human populations in a recurrent search for new agricultural land. Once the fertility of the land is exhausted, these areas are abandoned and left to be reforested through natural succession. Despite the widespread presence of secondary forests of various ages in West African landscapes, little is known about the trajectories of recovery and the environmental factors that influence recovery rates. We set up 96 0.2 ha forest plots, along a chronosequence of 1 to 40 years and including 7 controls, on which all trees larger than 2.5 cm in diameter at breast height were inventoried. We modelled the recovery trajectories of four complementary dimensions of biodiversity (richness, diversity, composition, indicators of old-growth forest) in a Bayesian framework. Our results show that the four dimensions of biodiversity recover at different rates, with composition recovering much faster than floristic diversity. Among the local, landscape, and historical factors studied, the number of remnants and proximity to old-growth forests have a positive impact on recovery rates, with, under good environmental conditions, the composition, richness, and diversity being almost completely recovered in less than 25 years. Our results demonstrate the very high resilience of the composition of the semi-deciduous forests of West Africa, but also suggest that the management of these post-forest areas must be differentiated according to the landscape context and the presence of isolated trees, which are the last vestiges of the former forest. In unfavourable conditions, natural dynamics should be assisted by agroforestry practices and local tree planting to allow for a rapid restoration of forest goods and services to local populations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier B.V. Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 1010
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Author Jabiol, J.; Corbara, B.; Dejean, A.; Cereghino, R.
Title Structure of aquatic insect communities in tank-bromeliads in a East-Amazonian rainforest in French Guiana Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Forest Ecology and Management Abbreviated Journal For. Ecol. Manage.
Volume (down) 257 Issue 1 Pages 351-360
Keywords Bromeliaceae; Classification; Community structure; Insects; Microcosms; Neural networks; Nouragues; Phytotelmata; Species richness
Abstract Tank-bromeliads are discrete habitats which contain distinct aquatic communities, and which commonly occur in the neotropics. Because they span a broad range of ecological gradients in terms of habitat structure and amount of resources, researchers study the associations between the biodiversity of communities and these gradients in rainforests, where the very high species richness and densities within other continuous habitats makes it difficult to quantify animal communities. We analysed the diversity of aquatic insect communities in relation to different tank-bromeliad species in a primary rainforest (French Guiana) using artificial intelligence and complex optimization techniques to classify communities and model their determinants. First, the self-organizing map (neural network) was used to classify 158 bromeliads according to the quantitative structure of the insect communities. Catopsis berteroniana and Guzmania lingulata formed separate clusters of plants on the virtual map, while Vriesea splendens, Vriesea pleiosticha and Aechmea melinonii were grouped together in the remaining clusters. Some insect taxa occurred in all bromeliads, while other taxa were specific to a given species. Second, general linear modelling allowed us to specify the influence of the bromeliad species; water volume and volume of fine particulate organic matter inside of the tank; elevation above the ground; and sampling site on taxonomic richness and insect abundance. The number of taxa and individuals per plant increased with greater water volume, but the slope of the relationships depended on the bromeliad species. The significant influence of bromeliad species suggested that at similar water volumes different plant species had different taxon richness and insect abundance. Greater amounts of fine particulate organic matter were detrimental to community diversity in the tanks, probably because they decreased available space by clogging it and/or affected oxygen concentrations. The influence of tank-bromeliad species on the aquatic insect community was primarily related to their physical (and probably chemical) features rather than to species-specific associations sensu stricto. The classification of bromeliads with respect to animal species is likely to provide referential schemes for those biodiversity patterns to be expected under certain conditions, and may help to target model communities for subsequent experimental research. (C) 2008 Elsevier B,V. All rights reserved.
Address [Jabiol, J.; Cereghino, R.] Univ Toulouse 3, Ecolab, Lab Ecol Fonctionnelle, CNRS,UMR 5245, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France, Email: cereghin@cict.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1127 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes ISI:000261856000038 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 124
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Author Almeras, T.; Fournier, M.
Title Biomechanical design and long-term stability of trees: Morphological and wood traits involved in the balance between weight increase and the gravitropic reaction Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Theoretical Biology Abbreviated Journal J. Theor. Biol.
Volume (down) 256 Issue 3 Pages 370-381
Keywords Mechanical design; Gravitropism; Bending stresses; Allometry; Reaction wood
Abstract Studies on tree biomechanical design usually focus on stem stiffness, resistance to breakage or uprooting, and elastic stability. Here we consider another biomechanical constraint related to the interaction between growth and gravity. Because stems are slender structures and are never perfectly symmetric, the increase in tree mass always causes bending movements. Given the current mechanical design of trees, integration of these movements over time would ultimately lead to a weeping habit unless some gravitropic correction occurs. This correction is achieved by asymmetric internal forces induced during the maturation of new wood. The long-term stability of a growing stem therefore depends on how the gravitropic correction that is generated by diameter growth balances the disturbance due to increasing self weight. General mechanical formulations based on beam theory are proposed to model these phenomena. The rates of disturbance and correction associated with a growth increment are deduced and expressed as a function of elementary traits of stem morphology, cross-section anatomy and wood properties. Evaluation of these traits using previously published data shows that the balance between the correction and the disturbance strongly depends on the efficiency of the gravitropic correction, which depends on the asymmetry of wood maturation strain, eccentric growth, and gradients in wood stiffness. By combining disturbance and correction rates, the gravitropic performance indicates the dynamics of stem bending during growth. It depends on stem biomechanical traits and dimensions. By analyzing dimensional effects, we show that the necessity for gravitropic correction might constrain stem allometric growth in the long-term. This constraint is compared to the requirement for elastic stability, showing that gravitropic performance limits the increase in height of tilted stem and branches. The performance of this function may thus limit the slenderness and lean of stems, and therefore the ability of the tree to capture light in a heterogeneous environment. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Address [Almeras, T.; Fournier, M.] INRA, UMR Ecol Forets Guyane, F-97310 Kourou, France, Email: t_almeras@hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ACADEMIC PRESS LTD ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes ISI:000263077100008 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 123
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Author Scotti, I.; Gugerli, F.; Pastorelli, R.; Sebastiani, F.; Vendramin, G.G.
Title Maternally and paternally inherited molecular markers elucidate population patterns and inferred dispersal processes on a small scale within a subalpine stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Forest Ecology and Management Abbreviated Journal For. Ecol. Manage.
Volume (down) 255 Issue 11 Pages 3806-3812
Keywords chloroplast microsatellites; mitochondrial minisatellites; pollen/seed dispersal; demography; spatial autocorrelation
Abstract The within-population spatial structure of genetic diversity is shaped by demographic processes, including historical accidents such as forest perturbations. Information drawn from the analysis of the spatial distribution of genetic diversity is therefore inherently linked to demographic-historical processes that ultimately determine the fate of populations. All adult trees and saplings in a 1.4-ha plot within a mixed Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) stand were characterised by means of chloroplast (paternally inherited) markers, and a large sub-sample of these were genotyped at mitochondrial (maternally inherited) molecular markers. These data were used to analyse the spatial distribution of genetic variation and to compare the patterns corresponding to the two marker types. The plot presented non-homogeneous local stem density in the younger cohorts, and the indirect effect of this source of variation on the spatial genetic structure was investigated. Results suggest that (i) spatially limited seed dispersal induced patchiness in genotype distribution, while pollen flow had a homogenising effect; (ii) deviations from random spatial structure were stronger in the demographically most stable portions of the stand, while they were weaker where sudden bursts of regeneration occurred; (iii) spatially overlapping adult and sapling cohorts displayed the same spatial genetic structure (stronger on stable areas, weaker in portions of the stand undergoing events of intense regeneration), which was substantiated by the influence of local demographic processes. Regeneration dynamics as modulated by demography thus influences the distribution of genetic diversity within the stand both in the younger life stages and in the adult population. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Address [Scotti, I.] INRA, UMR 0745, ECOFOG, F-97387 Kourou, France, Email: ivan.scotti@kourou.cirad.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1127 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes ISI:000257019100019 Approved no
Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 137
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Author Aguilos, M.; Hérault, B.; Burban, B.; Wagner, F.; Bonal, D.
Title What drives long-term variations in carbon flux and balance in a tropical rainforest in French Guiana? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 253–254 Issue Pages 114-123
Keywords Tropical rainforest; Nee; Gpp; Ecosystem respiration; Radiation; Drought
Abstract A thorough understanding of how tropical forests respond to climate is important to improve ecosystem process models and to reduce uncertainties in current and future global carbon balance calculations. The Amazon rainforest, a major contributor to the global carbon cycle, is subject to strong intra- and interannual variations in climate conditions. Understanding their effect on carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere and on the resulting carbon balance is still incomplete. We examined the long-term (over a 12-year period; 2004–2015) variations in gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in a tropical rainforest in French Guiana and identified key climatic drivers influencing the changes. The study period was characterized by strong differences in climatic conditions among years, particularly differences in the intensity of the dry and wet seasons, as well as differences in annual carbon fluxes and balance. Annual average GPP varied from 3384.9?g?C?m-2?yr?1 (95% CI [3320.7, 3445.9]) to 4061.2?g?C?m-2?yr?1 (95% CI [3980.1, 4145.0]). RE varied even more than GPP, with a difference of 933.1?C?m-2?yr?1 between the minimum (3020.6?g?C?m-2?yr?1; 95% CI [2889.4, 3051.3]) and maximum (3953.7?g?C?m-2?yr?1; 95% CI [3887.6, 4019.6]) values. Although NEE showed large interannual variability (nine-fold), from ?65.6?g?C?m-2?yr?1 (95% CI [?4.4, ?126.0]) to ?590.5?g?C?m-2 yr?1 (95% CI [?532.3, ?651.6]), the forest remained a carbon sink over the 12-year period. A combination of global radiation (Rg), relative extractable water (REW) and soil temperature (Ts) explained 51% of the daily variations for GPP, 30% for RE and 39% for NEE. Global radiation was always the best predictor of these variations, but soil water content and temperature did also influence carbon fluxes and balance. Seasonally, Rg was the major controlling factor for GPP, RE and NEE during the wet season. During the dry season, variations in carbon fluxes and balance were poorly explained by climate factors. Yet, REW was the key driver of variations in NEE during the dry season. This study highlights that, over the long-term, carbon fluxes and balance in such tropical rainforest ecosystems are largely controlled by both radiation and water limitation. Even though variations in Rg have a greater impact on these fluxes, water limitation during seasonal droughts is enough to reduce ecosystem productivity, respiration and carbon uptake. The reduced precipitation expected in tropical rainforest areas under future climatic conditions will therefore strongly influence carbon fluxes and carbon uptake. This study also highlights the importance for land surface or dynamic global vegetation models to consider the main drivers of carbon fluxes and balance separately for dry and wet seasons.
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ISSN 0168-1923 ISBN Medium
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Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 792
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Author Prunier, J.; Maurice, L.; Perez, E.; Gigault, J.; Pierson Wickmann, A.-C.; Davranche, M.; Halle, A.T.
Title Trace metals in polyethylene debris from the North Atlantic subtropical gyre Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environ. Pollut.
Volume (down) 245 Issue Pages 371-379
Keywords metals'accumulation; Microplastic; Plastic debris; Polyethylene; Polymer
Abstract Plastic pollution in the marine environment poses threats to wildlife and habitats through varied mechanisms, among which are the transport and transfer to the food web of hazardous substances. Still, very little is known about the metal content of plastic debris and about sorption/desorption processes, especially with respect to weathering. In this study, plastic debris collected from the North Atlantic subtropical gyre was analyzed for trace metals; as a comparison, new packaging materials were also analyzed. Both the new items and plastic debris showed very scattered concentrations. The new items contained significant amounts of trace metals introduced as additives, but globally, metal concentrations were higher in the plastic debris. The results provide evidence that enhanced metal concentrations increase with the plastic state of oxidation for some elements, such as As, Ti, Ni, and Cd. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of mineral particles on the surface of the plastic debris. This work demonstrates that marine plastic debris carries complex mixtures of heavy metals. Such materials not only behave as a source of metals resulting from intrinsic plastic additives but also are able to concentrate metals from ocean water as mineral nanoparticles or adsorbed species. Plastic debris collected from the North Atlantic subtropical gyre was analyzed for trace metals. Marine plastic debris carry complex mixtures of heavy metals but it is evidence that plastic oxidation favors their adsorption.
Address Univ Rennes, Geosciences, UMR CNRS 6118, bat 15, Campus de Beaulieu, Rennes Cedex, 35042, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 02697491 (Issn) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
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